PDF copies for download

biographical narrative
resume
statement

solo exhibitions

Glass Wheel Studio
Norfolk, VA
11.2015 to 1.2016

“Bound Forces”
The Gallery at R&F Paint
Kingston, NY
11.2015 to 1.2016

Define Earth: “Wet.Lands”
Redux Contemporary Art Center
Charleston, SC
10.2014 to 11.2014

“Beneath the Fold”
City Ice Arts Building
Kansas City, MO
4.2014

two and three person exhibitions

“Objects in Perspective: Artworks by Aspen Hochhalter and Natalie Abrams”
The Dairy Center for the Arts
Boulder, CO
TBD

“Objects in Perspective: Artworks by Aspen Hochhalter and Natalie Abrams”
Castel Photography Gallery
Asheville, NC
4.2015

“Objects in Perspective: Artworks by Aspen Hochhalter and Natalie Abrams”
Pease Gallery at Central Piedmont Community College
Charlotte, NC
9.2014 to 11.2014

Two person exhibition with Sarah Frost Sullivan
Mad Art Gallery
St. Louis, MO
10.2014

“Dear Nature” with Mi Sook-Hur and Cynthia Camlin
Artspace
Raleigh, NC
9.2013 to 10.2103

“Objects in Perspective: Artworks by Aspen Hochhalter and Natalie Abrams”
Gaston County Museum of Art and History
Dallas, NC
8.2013 to 10.2013

”Not Seeing the Forest”with Dorothy Robinson and Pamela Wallace
The Gallery at R&F Paint
Kingston, NY
2.2007 to 3.2007

select group exhibitions

“Made in Paint”
curated by Jim Walsh
Sam and Adele Golden Gallery
Golden Artist Colors
New Berlin, NY
4.2015

”Organic to Geometric: Investigations in Structure and Surface”
coordinated by Carol Pelletier and Joanne Mattera
Heftler Gallery at Endicott College
Beverly, MA
1.2015 to 3.2015

“Losing Ground, Gaining Perspective”
with Lorrie Fredette, Laura Moriarty and Paula Roland curated by Natalie Abrams
Gallery X at Castle Hill
Provincetown, MA
5.2013

McColl Center for Art and Innovation Resident Exhibition
curated by Lorie Mertes
Charlotte, NC
4.2013 to 9.2013

”Third Annual Encaustic Invitational”
Conrad Wilde Gallery
Tucson, AZ
3.2008

residencies and awards

2014 Artist in Residence, Redux Contemporary Art Center, Charleston, SC
2014 Artist in Residence, Sam and Adele Golden Foundation for the Arts, New Berlin, NY
2014 Artist in Residence, Escape to Create, Seaside, FL
2013 Artist in Residence, McColl Center for Art and Innovation, Charlotte NC

curatorial projects

2013 “Losing Ground, Gaining Perspective”, Gallery X at Castle Hill, Provincetown, MA

snippets, mentions and reviews

Objects in Perspective

Charlotte-based artists Natalie Abrams and Aspen Hochhalter do not make artworks together – they create separate bodies of work that are in conversation with each other. It is a rich, seamless collaboration.

Abrams, who has developed unique ways of working with wax, makes undulating ribbons, silky pools and other forms that are clearly inspired by nature, but are also clearly works of artifice.

Hochhalter, who works in the wet plate collodion process, an early photography technique, reinterprets Abrams’ works, in essence returning them to nature. In Hochhalter’s large prints (as well as the small glass negatives from which they are made), Abrams wax configurations look as if they are in primeval forests or under a microscope.
-Barbara Schreiber, Charlotte Observer
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/10/16/5246360/in-the-galleries-perception-reality.html#.VGOvw1fF80u
10.2014

City Ice Arts was incredibly empty for how mindboggling the work Beneath the Fold exhibited. The work of Natalie Abrams was both mind-bending and sexy. Wax folded sculptures stuck out from the walls, each bend and drip frozen in time. The smaller works, however, felt like analyzing a specimen under the microscope but contained the same insane mixture of spontaneity and control as the larger works. The sheer attention to detail seduces viewers into the material quality of the work. All of the square wax pieces were well executed and felt seamless.
-Melaney Ann Mitchell
http://informalityblog.com/first-friday-informalinform-review-april-2014/
4.2014

Natalie Abrams’ work seems inseparable from her process. Her media of choice – wax on wood panels – recalls Abstract Expressionist painting in its puddled drip patterns, layering of color, and gestural forms, but her work also harkens to intricate lapidarical forms and the layered shapes and patterns often found in nature (think growth rings, coral, plant stems and tree trunks.) Piecing together ribbon-like forms of wax in floral patterns and lyrical, bouquet-like shapes hardens both to the intricacy of her subject matter and the artists’s facility working within the plasticity of her media. It is this counterbalance of the two – precarious and fluid, malleable yet decisive and gestural – which is especially intriguing.
-Dave Delacambre
http://www.carolinaarts.com/913/913artspace.html
9.2013

The work of Natalie Abrams and Natalie Bork particularly resonated with me emotionally and visually…. Abrams also offers a textural experience, but with an entirely different medium: encaustic, which is a pigmented hot wax. Abrams’ ribbon like forms literally leap forward at the viewer, echoing the complex structures and textures of coral reefs and the seabed. Abrams is interested in the biodiversity of these natural landscapes as well as manmade environments like the urban-scape. Her work on view at the McColl is untitled, leaving the type of landscape up to the viewer. For me, works like “Untitled 11.14,” done on a wooden panel with the wood grain evident, recalled the bio-diverse environment of a live oak, where centuries of life has attracted mosses, ferns and mushrooms.
-Katherine Balcerek
7.2013
KnightArts.org

Some of the most fascinating pieces in the show were Natalie Abrams wax works and Nagy’s “Archetype” mixed media wall hangings, especially the “Madonna.” The Abrams’ pieces are solid, yet fluid and simple, yet complex. These wax wall sculptures seem light like fabric, with organic patterns that make it feel as though it once had life.
-Carmella Jarvi
11.2011
KnightArts.org

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

artist statement

artist statement

rooted in the concept of systems theory, my work explores the relationships which develop between species in biodiverse ecosystems and how those relationships are mirrored in the urban environment. specifically, i explore how both natural and urban systems are affected by external stressors such as climate change, loss of habitat and loss of bio-diversity.

my sculptures consist of vibrant creatures and delicate environments created with both natural materials and man made materials destined for landfill. playful organic structures break down to reveal their fragile underpinnings of a system in flux.

i find the parallels and dynamics between these relationships moving, and the impact of environmental stresses deeply concerning. these pieces reflect the physical experience of flash moments, the delicate beauty of our surroundings and the difficulty of preserving the present. this work examines where our
planet and its inhabitants have been, our current precarious state and what the future may hold. a snapshot of transitional states, i hope to stimulate conversations about the similarities we face in our own environments and what we can do to strengthen our communities and natural world.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

artist statement

artist statement

rooted in the concept of systems theory, my work explores the relationships which develop between species in biodiverse ecosystems and how those relationships are mirrored in the urban environment. specifically, i explore how both natural and urban systems are affected by external stressors such as climate change, loss of habitat and loss of bio-diversity.

my sculptures consist of vibrant creatures and delicate environments created with both natural materials and man made materials destined for landfill. playful organic structures break down to reveal their fragile underpinnings of a system in flux.

i find the parallels and dynamics between these relationships moving, and the impact of environmental stresses deeply concerning. these pieces reflect the physical experience of flash moments, the delicate beauty of our surroundings and the difficulty of preserving the present. this work examines where our
planet and its inhabitants have been, our current precarious state and what the future may hold. a snapshot of transitional states, i hope to stimulate conversations about the similarities we face in our own environments and what we can do to strengthen our communities and natural world.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

PDF copies for download

biographical narrative
resume
statement

solo exhibitions

Glass Wheel Studio
Norfolk, VA
11.2015 to 1.2016

“Bound Forces”
The Gallery at R&F Paint
Kingston, NY
11.2015 to 1.2016

Define Earth: “Wet.Lands”
Redux Contemporary Art Center
Charleston, SC
10.2014 to 11.2014

“Beneath the Fold”
City Ice Arts Building
Kansas City, MO
4.2014

two and three person exhibitions

“Objects in Perspective: Artworks by Aspen Hochhalter and Natalie Abrams”
The Dairy Center for the Arts
Boulder, CO
TBD

“Objects in Perspective: Artworks by Aspen Hochhalter and Natalie Abrams”
Castel Photography Gallery
Asheville, NC
4.2015

“Objects in Perspective: Artworks by Aspen Hochhalter and Natalie Abrams”
Pease Gallery at Central Piedmont Community College
Charlotte, NC
9.2014 to 11.2014

Two person exhibition with Sarah Frost Sullivan
Mad Art Gallery
St. Louis, MO
10.2014

“Dear Nature” with Mi Sook-Hur and Cynthia Camlin
Artspace
Raleigh, NC
9.2013 to 10.2103

“Objects in Perspective: Artworks by Aspen Hochhalter and Natalie Abrams”
Gaston County Museum of Art and History
Dallas, NC
8.2013 to 10.2013

”Not Seeing the Forest”with Dorothy Robinson and Pamela Wallace
The Gallery at R&F Paint
Kingston, NY
2.2007 to 3.2007

select group exhibitions

“Made in Paint”
curated by Jim Walsh
Sam and Adele Golden Gallery
Golden Artist Colors
New Berlin, NY
4.2015

”Organic to Geometric: Investigations in Structure and Surface”
coordinated by Carol Pelletier and Joanne Mattera
Heftler Gallery at Endicott College
Beverly, MA
1.2015 to 3.2015

“Losing Ground, Gaining Perspective”
with Lorrie Fredette, Laura Moriarty and Paula Roland curated by Natalie Abrams
Gallery X at Castle Hill
Provincetown, MA
5.2013

McColl Center for Art and Innovation Resident Exhibition
curated by Lorie Mertes
Charlotte, NC
4.2013 to 9.2013

”Third Annual Encaustic Invitational”
Conrad Wilde Gallery
Tucson, AZ
3.2008

residencies and awards

2014 Artist in Residence, Redux Contemporary Art Center, Charleston, SC
2014 Artist in Residence, Sam and Adele Golden Foundation for the Arts, New Berlin, NY
2014 Artist in Residence, Escape to Create, Seaside, FL
2013 Artist in Residence, McColl Center for Art and Innovation, Charlotte NC

curatorial projects

2013 “Losing Ground, Gaining Perspective”, Gallery X at Castle Hill, Provincetown, MA

snippets, mentions and reviews

Objects in Perspective

Charlotte-based artists Natalie Abrams and Aspen Hochhalter do not make artworks together – they create separate bodies of work that are in conversation with each other. It is a rich, seamless collaboration.

Abrams, who has developed unique ways of working with wax, makes undulating ribbons, silky pools and other forms that are clearly inspired by nature, but are also clearly works of artifice.

Hochhalter, who works in the wet plate collodion process, an early photography technique, reinterprets Abrams’ works, in essence returning them to nature. In Hochhalter’s large prints (as well as the small glass negatives from which they are made), Abrams wax configurations look as if they are in primeval forests or under a microscope.
-Barbara Schreiber, Charlotte Observer
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/10/16/5246360/in-the-galleries-perception-reality.html#.VGOvw1fF80u
10.2014

City Ice Arts was incredibly empty for how mindboggling the work Beneath the Fold exhibited. The work of Natalie Abrams was both mind-bending and sexy. Wax folded sculptures stuck out from the walls, each bend and drip frozen in time. The smaller works, however, felt like analyzing a specimen under the microscope but contained the same insane mixture of spontaneity and control as the larger works. The sheer attention to detail seduces viewers into the material quality of the work. All of the square wax pieces were well executed and felt seamless.
-Melaney Ann Mitchell
http://informalityblog.com/first-friday-informalinform-review-april-2014/
4.2014

Natalie Abrams’ work seems inseparable from her process. Her media of choice – wax on wood panels – recalls Abstract Expressionist painting in its puddled drip patterns, layering of color, and gestural forms, but her work also harkens to intricate lapidarical forms and the layered shapes and patterns often found in nature (think growth rings, coral, plant stems and tree trunks.) Piecing together ribbon-like forms of wax in floral patterns and lyrical, bouquet-like shapes hardens both to the intricacy of her subject matter and the artists’s facility working within the plasticity of her media. It is this counterbalance of the two – precarious and fluid, malleable yet decisive and gestural – which is especially intriguing.
-Dave Delacambre
http://www.carolinaarts.com/913/913artspace.html
9.2013

The work of Natalie Abrams and Natalie Bork particularly resonated with me emotionally and visually…. Abrams also offers a textural experience, but with an entirely different medium: encaustic, which is a pigmented hot wax. Abrams’ ribbon like forms literally leap forward at the viewer, echoing the complex structures and textures of coral reefs and the seabed. Abrams is interested in the biodiversity of these natural landscapes as well as manmade environments like the urban-scape. Her work on view at the McColl is untitled, leaving the type of landscape up to the viewer. For me, works like “Untitled 11.14,” done on a wooden panel with the wood grain evident, recalled the bio-diverse environment of a live oak, where centuries of life has attracted mosses, ferns and mushrooms.
-Katherine Balcerek
7.2013
KnightArts.org

Some of the most fascinating pieces in the show were Natalie Abrams wax works and Nagy’s “Archetype” mixed media wall hangings, especially the “Madonna.” The Abrams’ pieces are solid, yet fluid and simple, yet complex. These wax wall sculptures seem light like fabric, with organic patterns that make it feel as though it once had life.
-Carmella Jarvi
11.2011
KnightArts.org

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

artist statement

rooted in the concept of systems theory, my work explores the relationships which develop between species in biodiverse ecosystems and how those relationships are mirrored in the urban environment. specifically, i explore how both natural and urban systems are affected by external stressors such as climate change, loss of habitat and loss of bio-diversity.

my sculptures consist of vibrant creatures and delicate environments created with both natural materials and man made materials destined for landfill. playful organic structures break down to reveal their fragile underpinnings of a system in flux.

i find the parallels and dynamics between these relationships moving, and the impact of environmental stresses deeply concerning. these pieces reflect the physical experience of flash moments, the delicate beauty of our surroundings and the difficulty of preserving the present. this work examines where our planet and its inhabitants have been, our current precarious state and what the future may hold. a snapshot of transitional states, i hope to stimulate conversations about the similarities we face in our own environments and what we can do to strengthen our communities and natural world.